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Criminal Trespass

Criminal Trespass charges are misdemeanors and are lesser crimes than the felony burglary crimes.  Criminal Trespass First Degree is a gross misdemeanor punishable up to 364 days in jail and a $5,000 fine.  Criminal Trespass Second Degree is a simple misdemeanor punishable up to 90 days in jail and a $1,000 fine.

  Degree of seriousness Definition
Criminal Trespass 1st Degree Gross Misdemeanor A person is guilty of criminal trespass in the first degree if he knowingly enters or remains unlawfully in a building. RCW 9A.52.070
Criminal Trespass 2nd Degree Simple Misdemeanor A person is guilty of criminal trespass in the second degree if he knowingly enters or remains unlawfully in or upon premises of another under circumstances not constituting criminal trespass in the first degree.  RCW 9A.52.080

Both Criminal Trespass First and Second Degrees require the State to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that someone acted knowingly. This means if you did not know you were not supposed to be in the building or on the premises, a good criminal defense attorney could defeat the underlying trespass charge. There are also several statutory defenses to these charges that a good criminal defense attorney can pursue.

Ms. Odama has litigated hundreds of criminal trespass cases before and is knowledgeable about the various defenses one may have available. It is very important to have an experienced and aggressive criminal attorney like Ms. Odama by your side.


This web page is for informational purposes only. Visitors should not rely upon information on this web page as a substitute for personal legal advice. While we make every effort to provide accurate information, laws can change and inaccuracies happen despite our best efforts. Contact us If you have an individual legal problem so we can help you with your issue.